Thoughts create reality.

92,324 notes

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(via thecharliecharmander)

Filed under tfios q

51,043 notes

nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

(via sagihairius)

Filed under q

28,689 notes

ollivander:

kvothetheraving:

fuck this shit
it is entirely inconsistent with elizabeth’s character for her to drop everything (PIRATE KING thank you very much) to raise a child as a landlubber
give me elizabeth, eight months pregnant, still running the show from shipwreck cove
give me elizabeth and her six-year-old son cabin boy kicking ass and taking names as they outrun the royal navy
give me elizabeth, instead of waiting for will, sailing out to meet him
give me elizabeth dying at sea four years and one week later and signing aboard the flying dutchman to the shock of its captain
give me elizabeth and will co-captaining the dutchman and sailing the seas beyond the edge of the world for eternity together
give me young billy (i’m forced to assume they, as pirates, are unimaginative when it comes to names) telling the story of william turner, who gave up everything for the woman he loved, and elizabeth swann, who took it back with sword and pistol

something always bothered me about that ending and now I know what it was god bless

ollivander:

kvothetheraving:

fuck this shit

it is entirely inconsistent with elizabeth’s character for her to drop everything (PIRATE KING thank you very much) to raise a child as a landlubber

give me elizabeth, eight months pregnant, still running the show from shipwreck cove

give me elizabeth and her six-year-old son cabin boy kicking ass and taking names as they outrun the royal navy

give me elizabeth, instead of waiting for will, sailing out to meet him

give me elizabeth dying at sea four years and one week later and signing aboard the flying dutchman to the shock of its captain

give me elizabeth and will co-captaining the dutchman and sailing the seas beyond the edge of the world for eternity together

give me young billy (i’m forced to assume they, as pirates, are unimaginative when it comes to names) telling the story of william turner, who gave up everything for the woman he loved, and elizabeth swann, who took it back with sword and pistol

something always bothered me about that ending and now I know what it was god bless

(via sagihairius)

Filed under q